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Category: Religion

This Bill Maher and Ben Affleck Exchange Is Incredibly Important For Liberals and Conservatives

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Let me first just say that I’m not sure if keeping score on something like this is good for anyone… But Bill had a strong point to make, but so did Ben actually.

Wow… I love a good debate, and this really was a huge debate to watch. On one side you have the liberal force of “tolerance” so that we don’t lump groups in a distortion of their true character (represented by Mr. Affleck), and on the other side we have the liberal cornerstone of an activism that has zero tolerance for any social and economic oppression subjugated by any ideology (represented by Mr. Maher). This article sums up a good portion of how I feel, but I think there is more to it. I think that what Bill was saying is incredibly important, and I think that what Ben was saying is crucial to actually solving the problem. Bill was pointing out that renouncing your faith should not be cause for being put to death, which it is perceived to be for many people. He quoted that something like 90% of Egyptians felt that leaving Islam should result in capital punishment, and I thought I’d heard the same about Saudi Arabia. That is astounding to me, and assuming that the polling is correct I am left terrified of how we might bridge the divide in our cultures.

Ben however, was taking a firm stance that you can’t just throw entire regions and cultures out like this – which I find admirable in terms of how we may ever have to address this problem. Where I find myself frustrated on this front is the double standard between the Middle East and the Heartland of America. Liberals like Ben (and maybe not him more specifically) almost predictably take this stance of not throwing the baby out with the bathwater on people and their cultures, until it comes to the Christian coalition (not the necessarily the actual organization with that name) of people across this country who are reamed constantly by the media for having faith. Some groups and individuals who call themselves Christians probably deserve some harsh feedback, but we don’t usually hear this same kind of nuanced approach with Christianity in America.

If someone wants to go after religion they don’t necessarily hurt my feelings – society needs people like that so you don’t end up with a population that thinks we should kill people who don’t believe in what we believe in and can’t prove. BUT, if you are going to do it you should remain consistent, and nuanced in your value judgements of these differing groups and their ideas. I wish Bill wouldn’t be so willing to throw people out like he does, and I wish Ben would clarify his standard, as well as recognize that what Bill was saying is scary. If those poll numbers don’t scare you then you must not be paying attention…

I will actually be taking a trip in November with my good buddy Gavin to Egypt, and I just want to say that I can’t wait to meet these people who are often villainized by the media – and who like me don’t have the world figured out yet. I’m sure we could come up with some astounding polling from the United States over the last century, so to side with Ben for a second I hope that we can work on finding our common ground so that maybe we can work on exchanging our best ideas, and not just harp on our differences.

So, here is the exchange, and below is a very interesting article about the whole thing. Please feel free to give me your feedback:

And due to neither of these men being representatives of Islam I figured we’d throw in this Reza Aslan interview that would most support Ben’s thinking for before you read an article about why Bill is right:

The Daily Beast
 

Bill Maher 1, Ben Affleck 0

The Real Time host’s spat with the Gone Girl star gets to the heart of a major and longtime problem within contemporary Western liberalism

Every once in a great while, something happens on television that you know while you’re watching it: Well, this is unusual. Those old enough to know what I’m talking about when I say “Al Campanis”  will remember that that was one of your more extreme cases. The exchange between Bill Maher and Ben Affleck on last Friday’s Real Time wasn’t a Campanis moment, but I knew instantly—watching it in, well, real time, as it were—that this was going to spark discussion,  as indeed it has.

In case you missed it, the two—both committed and thoughtful liberals—got into it on the question of whether Western liberals can or should criticize Islam. Mentioning freedom of speech and equal rights, Maher said: “These are liberal principles that liberals applaud for, but then when you say in the Muslim world, this is what’s lacking, then they get upset.” Sam Harris, the atheist author, agreed with Maher and said, “The crucial point of confusion is that we have been sold this meme of Islamophobia where every criticism of the doctrine of Islam gets conflated with bigotry towards Muslims as people. That is intellectually ridiculous.” Affleck, as if on cue, challenged Harris: “Are you the person who understands the officially codified doctrine of Islam?” And then: “So you’re saying that Islamophobia is not a real thing?” Right after, Affleck said that such criticisms of Islam were “gross” and “racist” and “like saying [to Maher] ‘you’re a shifty Jew.’”

It was cracking good TV, but it was more—it hit home because they were describing one of the most important debates within liberalism of the last…10 years certainly, as pertains to Islam, but 40 or 50 years as relates to arguments between the developed and the developing world, and close to a century when it comes to discussions of how culture should affect our understanding of universal, or as some would have it “universal,” principles. Reluctance to criticize the failures of other cultures has been a problem within contemporary liberalism, with negative consequences I’ll go into below. So this liberal is firmly on Maher’s side, even as I recognize that his rendering is something of a caricature.

Here’s some quick history for you. First, the Enlightenment happened, and humankind developed the idea of universal rights. ’Round about the 1920s, some scholars in the then-newish field of cultural anthropology started to argue that all rights, or at least values, were not universal, and that we (the West) should be careful about imposing our values on societies with traditions and customs so removed from our own.

A big moment here came with the debate over the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which asserted the universalist position without apology and which was pushed mostly by mainstream political liberals (Eleanor Roosevelt most notably). There were many critiques of the declaration from what we would today call “the left,” but those voices had little juice in those days, and when the UN adopted the declaration, it was a great victory for liberalism.

Fade in, fade out. Then came the anti-colonialist uprisings of the 1950s, Frantz Fanon, postmodern political theory, Vietnam, the Israeli occupation, the intifada, et cetera et cetera. All of these and many other kindred events seeped into the liberal bloodstream, still rich in universalist cells but now also coursing with the competing cells of cultural relativism (invariably a pejorative these days, although it wasn’t always).

And so, yes, we have seen in recent years from liberalism, or at least from some liberals (a crucial distinction, in fact), an unwillingness to criticize the reactionary aspects or expressions of other cultures, expressions that these liberals would have no hesitation whatsover in criticizing if they were exhibited by, say, Southern white Christians.

The most obvious example that comes to mind is that of Ayaan Hirsi Ali, the Muslim-African-Dutch-and-finally-American feminist intellectual. She of course is famous, now mostly for some of her more incendiary comments, but recall how she first became so: She and her collaborator, Theo van Gogh, had made a film critical of the oppression of women in the Muslim world. He was murdered, and she received death threats. She fled to the United States.

Now, here was a key moment: When she came to America in 2006, where was Hirsi Ali going to plant her flag? As she tells the story in her book Nomad, she met with liberal and conservative outfits. She says the liberal ones were “tentative” in their support for her and her ideas, but the conservative American Enterprise Institute embraced her totally, even though on certain issues (like abortion rights) she’s no conservative.

Hirsi Ali, of course, has subsequently gone on to say, quite controversially, that not just radical Islam but “Islam, period” must be “defeated.” But here’s the question: Before she started talking like that, why was she unable to find a home within American liberalism? It should be, and should have been, a core part of the mission of liberalism to support secular humanists and small-d democrats from all over the world, but from the Muslim world in particular. Most of these people are themselves liberals by Western standards, and they are desperate for the United States to do what it can to oppose the theocracies and autocracies under which they’re forced to live.

Maher, and certainly conservative critics, overstate the extent to which liberals fail to make common cause with such folks. Christian evangelicals who do work on, say, genital mutilation (which Hirsi Ali suffered) get a lot more attention in the media, because it’s more “interesting” that white conservatives give a crap about something happening to nonwhite women halfway across the world. But as the writer Michelle Goldberg pointed out in a review of Hirsi Ali’s Nomad for the journal I edit, Democracy, numerous women’s organizations and feminist groups do work to advance women’s rights in the Muslim world.

Goldberg wrote: “A few years ago, I visited Tasaru Ntomonok, which is the kind of place Hirsi Ali would probably love—it’s a Kenyan shelter that houses and educates girls fleeing female genital mutilation and forced marriage. Among its supporters are the high profile feminist Eve Ensler, the feminist NGO Equality Now, and the United Nations Population Fund, a bête noire of many conservatives. There are similar grassroots organizations working toward women’s liberation all over the world.”

Even so, Maher has identified a problem within Western liberalism today. Debates about multiculturalism are appropriate to a later stage of development of the infrastructure of rights and liberties than one finds in some other parts of the world. That infrastructure has existed in Western countries for a century, and it is the very fact that it was so solidly entrenched that opened up the space for us to start having debates about multiculturalism in the 1970s and ’80s.

But in much of the Arab and Muslim world, that infrastructure barely exists. So—and how’s this for a paradox?—to insist that our Western standards that call for multiculturalist values should be applied to countries that haven’t yet fully developed the basic rights infrastructure constitutes its own kind of imposition of our values onto them. A liberated woman or a gay man who lives in a country where being either of those things is at best unaccepted and at worst illegal doesn’t need multiculturalism. They’re desperate for a little universalism, and we Western liberals need to pay more attention to this.

via Bill Maher 1, Ben Affleck 0 – The Daily Beast.

This Man Was Given 2 Years To Live With ALS In 1963, And He’s Still Alive… And That’s Not Even The Most Interesting Thing About Him.

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Stephen Hawking has ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease). Did I just blow your mind? Discovering this bit of information was actually somewhat exciting for me, as I have always thought of the disease to be an absolute guarantee of death within a few years. I realize that a lot of people that I know do not like Mr. Hawking, and you don’t have to (no one can make you), but it is probably worth at least learning his story, and what makes him significant (other than the fact that he’s survived having ALS for half of a century). It will probably comfort a lot of my friends at least somewhat to know that Mr. Hawking isn’t as militant an atheist as some. He has actually been quoted saying:

“An expanding universe does not preclude a creator, but it does place limits on when he might have carried out his job!” – Stephen Hawking

 

The recent ALS Ice Bucket Challenge campaign has been unbelievably successful. Much of the success of this campaign is probably correlated with the fact that there seemed to be a very simple, and kind of fun activity that tangibly allows people to at least do something, other than give money. The other side of the campaign that is probably responsible for having raised $94.3 million, in less than a month (as opposed to $2.7 million in the same time period the previous year) is the outpouring of personal stories. I recently read the book “You Are Now Less Dumb”, and in this book David McRaney attempts to establish that the most basic of human instincts is to have a narrative – we must make sense of it all. He tries to explain how we tell ourselves simple lies sometimes just to make sense of our environment. It might seem like I’m bringing this up to say that religion is an opiate, but that is not my intent. I simply want to describe the importance in the human condition of relating to others. This is what Stephen looked like before ALS took over his body:

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SO, here is my challenge to you: I challenge you to watch this and try to address your prejudices against Mr. Hawking, be they ideological or biological – or simply watch it and enjoy it. I believe there is a God, and that in principle is why I would want to hear as much from someone like Hawking as possible. If you don’t have time for the video I at least urge you to read about some of Mr. Hawking’s discoveries and theories, he is a pretty smart fellow. Now I think I’ll go listen to the audiobook for his record breaking best selling book “A Brief History of Time”.

via Hawking 2013 – YouTube.

Tired of That “I Want To Go To Church And Not Be Called Dumb Or Bigoted” Feeling? You’re Not Alone.

 

 

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In 2008 I moved to China to live with a group of Americans in China (including my sister) who had pledged to live amongst the Chinese, and teach English in their schools as a form of ministry. We of course couldn’t be overt,  that would have been illegal, but we would live our lives and set examples so that they might find themselves curious why we loved so freely, and shared what we had with such ease – well that was the goal at least. While I was living in China someone introduced me to the teachings of Tim Keller, and at first my pride prevented me from giving it a shot and listening to my friend’s advice (and I think this same know-it-all mentality is a one of the biggest plagues of the human condition).  Ever since I began listening to Mr. Keller I have found great comfort in people having differing opinions, and in the idea that God made me curious and surely wants me to ask as many questions as I genuinely am able!!!

I just ran across this clip recently, while I recommend watching longer talks of his, I know about this “know-it-all” human condition from which all people seem susceptible of falling victim, so I figured I’d post a short and sweet video as an introduction for anyone willing to listen for a hand full of minutes on this beautiful Sunday. If you are interested in hearing more from Tim I recommend watching his talks at Google, which were reported at the time to have been the most crowded lectures by an author at Google (which surprised me). I will post one of them below from when he went to Google to discuss his book “A Reason For God”. I hope you enjoy.

 

Tim Keller at Google

Richard Dawkins vs. Cardinal George Pell on Q&A (10-4-12)

As much as people don’t seem to generally love debates, or questioning their own faith, I really love finding a good religious debate YouTube. I thought this one was pretty great. Have a great Sunday.

Kony, M23, and The Real Rebels of Congo: What Happened to Kony 2012, and What’s Next? – VICE

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If you are reading this you are most likely on the internet, and thus have more likely than not heard of Joseph Kony, who is the leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA). The LRA is famous for recruiting young children, brainwashing them to kill without hesitation, and then putting weapons in their hands. A group called Invisible Children has pushed to put an end to this senselessness. In the last couple of year one of their main founders, Jason Russell, launched a campaign to make a real push to get the word out about Kony while people were paying a bit more attention in the Presidential election year. Well, the campaign became much bigger than he’d ever expected, and it ended with Mr. Russell having somewhat of a personal meltdown, which sadly enough was ridiculed heavily, and somehow made light of the tragedies that have taken place over the last several years, and the work that Jason had been putting into stopping them.

Well, the “Kony 2012” campaign seems to have died out quite a bit, but there are still plenty who are interested in the situation. However, VICE, my favorite investigative reporting organization, has some questions about Kony, and any other rebel groups in the region, in particular the constantly war torn Democratic People’s Republic of Congo.

Lisa Ling Talks with Leader of Exodus International about Abandoning Reparative Therapy – “Our America”

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Reparative Therapy, simply put is the counseling-like practice of attempting to get people who are alleged or professed to be attracted to their same gender to change their mind and peruse those of the opposite sex. This practice is a relatively common practice in America, in fact in the last Presidential election one of the Republican candidates (Rep. Michel Bachmann) helped run a family practice that implemented the practice of reparative therapy. This type of psychological practice has been deemed as unhelpful, and actually very harmful by virtually any reputable psychological board or agency.

As I’ve said before in posts such as this, I am not gay, but I feel responsible for the well-being of those who are struggling to protect themselves. I know multiple people who were either victims of this type of therapy as children or young adults, and it seems to have caused some serious trauma in each case.

You do not have to agree with the idea of supporting same sex marriage (although it might be worth considering all of the implications of limiting the rights of others on behalf of your own personal comfort / taste), however finding out that something like this has been psychologically unhelpful and flat out abusive deserves your attention, assuming you don’t actually wish ill on gay people because they are gay.

I’ve relayed this Bill Maher joke before, but I’ll do it again – one thing that I have in common with homophobic people is that I too am freaked out by the idea of boys kissing, so I guess I won’t kiss any. However, I don’t think that my comfort level should dictate their rights, or their health.

P.S. My wonderful sister was on this show last year (not this episode) speaking about childhood obesity (as she is a child psychologist). She reported that Lisa Ling is absolutely the “real deal”. She said that she was gracious and kind, and actually took it upon herself to help beyond the programming of the show to get an overweight child the help that they needed. This report from my sister of course only expanded my crush on Lisa Ling…

Lisa Ling Talks with Leader of Exodus International about Abandoning Reparative Therapy – “Our America”

20130626-071347.jpg

Reparative Therapy, simply put is the counseling-like practice of attempting to get people who are alleged or professed to be attracted to their same gender to change their mind and peruse those of the opposite sex. This practice is a relatively common practice in America, in fact in the last Presidential election one of the Republican candidates (Rep. Michel Bachmann) helped run a family practice that implemented the practice of reparative therapy. This type of psychological practice has been deemed as unhelpful, and actually very harmful by virtually any reputable psychological board or agency.

As I’ve said before in posts such as this, I am not gay, but I feel responsible for the well-being of those who are struggling to protect themselves. I know multiple people who were either victims of this type of therapy as children or young adults, and it seems to have caused some serious trauma in each case.

You do not have to agree with the idea of supporting same sex marriage (although it might be worth considering all of the implications of limiting the rights of others on behalf of your own personal comfort / taste), however finding out that something like this has been psychologically unhelpful and flat out abusive deserves your attention, assuming you don’t actually wish ill on gay people because they are gay.

I’ve relayed this Bill Maher joke before, but I’ll do it again – one thing that I have in common with homophobic people is that I too am freaked out by the idea of boys kissing, so I guess I won’t kiss any. However, I don’t think that my comfort level should dictate their rights, or their health.

P.S. My wonderful sister was on this show last year (not this episode) speaking about childhood obesity (as she is a child psychologist). She reported that Lisa Ling is absolutely the “real deal”. She said that she was gracious and kind, and actually took it upon herself to help beyond the programming of the show to get an overweight child the help that they needed. This report from my sister of course only expanded my crush on Lisa Ling…

Just a Reminder That Letting Gay Parents Get Married is Maybe Not So Bad…

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History was made today, twice in fact, as the United States Supreme Court struck down DOMA (the Defense of Marriage Act, poorly named in my opinion), and the standing for Proposition 8 in California (which was a democratically lead initiative to make same sex marriage illegal). A lot of people are going to be very upset, and a lot of people are going to be very excited. And honestly there are going to be a lot of people who don’t really care… I think that in these times of administrative scandal and executive mistrust we might want to come together and agree in lessening the governments roll in certain aspects of our lives.

A couple of years ago Zach Wahls had the chance to speak in front of his representative body in the Iowa Congress to talk about Gay Marriage, and he told a short but sweet story. So sweet in fact it ended up getting him a speaking spot at the Democratic National Convention. But you know what? That speech could have very well been at the Republican National Convention if Republicans would’ve claimed this issue as a way to tell the government to back off… It’s not too late to feel that way, and to get on board the at least somewhat libertarian bandwagon. Well, I’m not quite as well spoken as Zach, so I’ll let his infamous speech do the talking

 

A few months ago I blogged about Proposition 8 specifically in regards to those who are a part of religious organizations who oppose marriage equality from the bully pulpit of public opinion. This day might be a lesson to some of those members of society, but maybe not. Feel free to read it by CLICKING HERE.

Tim Keller Speaking at Google About His Book “The Reason for God”

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Tim Keller is one of my super heroes. If you’ve got time you should watch as much as possible.

Debate – William Lane Craig vs Christopher Hitchens – Does God Exist?

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I love a good debate, and I love the topic of faith in a higher being. This is a long one, but enjoyable. I tend to find myself enjoying my ideas and faith more when I actually have to question them – therefore I can become more certain in what I find myself willing to defend. Have fun 🙂

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